North Shore Distance Running Club Newsletters

Aug 17

Written by: billp
8/17/2017 5:13 PM  RssIcon

Greetings Fellow Runners –

So, how did last Saturday’s run go for everyone? It was a long one for everyone – 15, 17, or 18 miles. The weather was certainly conducive to a good run. Sorry that I missed it. I will be joining the group again this week for an even longer run.

Last week’s and this week’s run – From what I heard, the trail was fine last week and most people had a good run. Thanks to Joan Rush for assisting with the training tips and announcements. For the first time in several weeks, the subject line has the direction for this week’s run. We’re heading north on the DPR Trail, much further than we’ve been able to travel since the flooding. The distances are known and below:

Novice marathon - 16 miles

Intermediates - 18 miles

Advanced – 20 miles

This is our Advanced marathon runners’ first 20 miler. Intermediates will be right behind them at 18. For our Novice marathon runners, 16 miles will be the longest that they’ve ever run. Since it’s 3 miles further than a half marathon, I’ve always considered 16 to be the threshold of a ‘really long run.’ Novices will cross the threshold on Saturday.

Hydration – Thanks to Rohit Sinha, Samantha Dolen and Neil Pinzur for providing hydration last week. This week is Efren Heredia at the parking lot and Martin Rivera, Gary Cueno, and Jeff Van Laeke on the course. There are 3 stations on the course because we’re running so long.

Chicago Marathon information – Waves and corrals are set. You can review your assignment on the marathon website. Also, the marathon is staring to promote the elites in this year’s field, which I’ll include in this newsletter for your reference:

Dennis Kipruto Kimetto (Kenya): current marathon and Chicago Marathon course record holder
• Valentine Kipketer (Kenya): third-place finisher at the 2016 Chicago Marathon
• Stephen Sambu(Kenya):: three-time Bank of America Shamrock Shuffle 8Kchampion

Ready to Run 20 – Our last really long run will be the Ready to Run 20 on Sunday, September 17. There will be no organized group run that weekend in Libertyville. This is it. If you are a CARA MTP participant, you still need to sign up. There is no additional charge since it is part of the MTP program but you still must be signed up. If you are an NSDRC member, you must pay a fee and sign up at http://www.cararuns.org/en/Train/ReadytoRun/. It’s $40 for CARA members who are not Marathon Training Program participants. You can request to be placed in your current group when you register or your pace group leader can request the members of their group. As a courtesy to our runners, we offer bus service to and from the northern suburbs to the start and finish. You just need to wake up and run 20 miles. We do the rest for you. More details will be provided in upcoming newsletters. Just make sure that you are registered now. I’ve signed up. Have you? If not, what are you waiting for?

Training tips – Since this may be some runners’ longest run ever, this week’s tip relates to the long run, the most important part of marathon training:
This article offers 2 types of long runs; Novices should only follow the first, which is the LSD run:

https://www.mcmillanrunning.com/articlePages/article/2

http://www.coloradoan.com/story/sports/2014/08/07/long-run-key-marathon-training-experts-say/13745979/

http://www.marathontraining.com/marathon/m_longr.html

Since the rest of my August is bereft of concerts or music festivals, I’ll have to close my newsletters with another topic for the next few weeks. This one is near and dear to me, and has been mentioned in previous seasons: reusable grocery bags. If you’re still using plastic grocery bags, you are damaging our environment and harming animals. Don’t believe that your hurting animals? Read this: http://www.seattletimes.com/nation-world/in-norway-zoologist-find-30-plastic-bags-in-stranded-whale/. The city of Chicago charges $0.07 per bag and has reduced usage by 33%. Evanston is considering a $0.10 charge. California and many countries ban them entirely. While the suburbs that we live in aren’t as enlightened as Chicago, Evanston, or California, you can still do your part to help the world. When asked why most people don’t use them, the most response is ‘people forget to bring them with them.’ Here’s a solution that I use and I barely can remember my kids’ names: keep them in your car’s compartment, not the trunk. You’ll see them and they will be a reminder that you should bring them in the store with you. If you forget and you’re already in the store, try this: wheel all of the food in your cart out to your car and then bag it in your re-useable bags there. I’d like to request that anyone reading this newsletter personally stop using those despicable plastic grocery bags. The environment, our wildlife, and I will all thank you for it. Plus, you’ll develop the habit so that when our suburbs begin their bans, you’ll be ready for it.

Good Running,


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